Selling Democracy by the Pound

for-sale-democracySome of my more regular readers will have noticed my absence from the these pages over the past coupe of months as I took some time out from retail cogitation to try my hand at politics.

My nomination came at a transitional point in my career as my company had just closed it’s last high street store after making the decision back in 2013 that we would move our business into other channels. I’m also looking at more ethical areas of retail so again the Green Party seemed a good fit.

I had actually intended to take a few months off to relax before launching a new business, and really accepted the candidacy as a paper exercise. But as with so many things I become involved in, I couldn’t just go through the motions.

Many people found it odd that I should have stood for the Green Party in one of the safest Conservative seats in the country. Firstly because The Greens aren’t generally known as great lovers of business, and secondly because I had about as much chance of winning as I had of joining The Spice Girls on their next reunion tour.

But I didn’t go into the campaign expecting to win. I did it for the experience and to make a point. The point being that business can be a force for good in society. I’m currently exploring a concept that I, and a few others, have come to call social capitalism. It’s a movement I believe small and medium businesses should be an integral part of, and a party like the Greens, being so far untainted by the guiding fist of big corporates, seemed like a good place to start.

Familiar Ground

Political campaigning felt strangely familiar to me as a retailer. And really that should have been less of a surprise. An election is essentially a marketing exercise with yourself as the product. So it soon became obvious that many of the skills I’d learnt at the helm of a multi-channel retail business could be easily applied to the more esoteric ideals of politics.

This was an election that many people predicted would be won online, with social media playing a big part in the campaigning process. It certainly seemed that way to me as Facebook, Twitter and Email accounts became integral to my political routine using software that was obviously based on CRM systems that would be familiar to any customer service manager. And I did indeed find these channels to be an essential element to getting the message out there, just as I do in my retail business.

I also saw many other candidates fall foul of not paying enough attention to these avenues, as well as some that used them entirely inappropriately. Branding has also become an important aspect of any political party and The Green Party really seemed to get it’s act together on standardising the look of logos and marketing material, which was encouraging.

Hustings were no different in my mind to a simple sales pitch and I even found myself back standing behind a market stall, although this time my stock in trade was leaflets, manifestos and my own personality, such as it is.

Too Big Data

The other familiar aspect to all this though was that frequently cited phenomenon – Big Data. This is a buzzphrase I’ve never been entirely comfortable with. To me it should really be called ‘Too Big Data’.

I’ve always been suspicious of the idea that the more analysis you do, the more data you have, the more accurate your forecasts will be. This is self evidently not the case. And the plethora of polls, super-polls and polls of polls during the election on served to underline this point by being so spectacularly wrong. Not a single published poll correctly predicted the correct result. Although there are reports that some pollsters did have results that reflected the actual outcome, but they were so far adrift from others that they were nervous of publishing them.

As many retailers will attest, analyses are all very well, but ultimately there’s nothing remotely predictable about the great British public, as voters or consumers. In that context I suppose it was a stroke of genius on behalf of the Conservatives to employ a former market analyst as their campaign manager. One who arguably used these inaccurate polls in a feat of misdirection worthy of any accomplished prestidigitator.

Or maybe it just goes to prove that it’s not how much data you have, it’s how you choose to interpret it that counts.

Money Back Guarantee!

article-1279806-09A92C17000005DC-437_634x369So there you have it. My brief political career dashed on the rocks of our rather arcane electoral system and a bit of good old fashioned market manipulation.

With so many unexpected parallels with the worlds of marketing and retail, it has left me wondering even more about what really constitutes democracy.

If we’re increasingly going to be sold ideology and aspiration like packets of soap powder, maybe there should be the same sorts of checks and balances as there are in the world of consumer protection.

Perhaps if politicians were made to operate under the same stringent regulations that retailers have to abide by every day, we may see a few less un-kept promises and bit more attention paid to customer satisfaction.

In which case will we be entitled to a full refund if yet another government fails to perform as advertised?

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